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Iridium GO! connects schools to paint

John Dyer is the founder of Last Chance to Paint and an artist at the residence of the world’s largest rainforest, The Eden Project, in the UK. John also works with The Born Free Foundation.

In 1989, the late Douglas Adams traveled with zoologist Mark Carwardine to observe endangered animals in the hope of attracting more attention to this issue and increasing overall awareness of environmental issues. Douglas Adams has published the book Last Chance to See and a documentary on the BBC that allows viewers to join in their journey.

In turn, over the past 20 years, John Dyer has painted in many wonderful and endangered places, using art as a means of emphasizing what we can lose. The ability to allow children to “travel” and ask questions interactively, create art for themselves, inspired the author to transfer questions about the threat to the environment to the school class. By agreement with Mark Karvardin, the project “Last Chance to Paint” was born, similar to the book by Douglas Adams.

Iridium GO satellite hotspot
Using the latest satellite technology from Iridium, “The Last Chance to Draw” allows schools around the world to experience deep feelings from virtual encounters with endangered plants, animals and the environment, creating a deep personal connection with them. Interactive adventures are made possible by the Iridium satellite network. “Last Chance to Draw” has an interactive blog that allows students to ask questions that travelers can answer online. During their travels, the authors used the Iridium GO! Satellite hotspot daily to receive questions and update the blog with answers to transfer their adventures directly to school classrooms. Photos and other blog information are sent via e-mail to a special site through Iridium GO !, and the site automatically publishes the content. It is very smart, simple and convenient, and Iridium GO! earned many kind words for his clear work.

Iridium GO! In June 2019, the Last Chance to Draw team traveled to a very remote part of the Amazon where the Yawanawá tribe shared their culture and history with the world. Being deep in the Amazon rainforest, at least 12 hours from any nearby mobile phone, would be terrible, but with Iridium GO! travelers never lost touch. Throughout the journey Iridium GO! allowed you to virtually communicate and share with children the information of the “Last Chance to Draw.” It was enough to raise the device’s antenna, launch the application on a smartphone, and then magically communicate with the world. Iridium GO! allowed you to talk, write email to the blog, sending photos and texts, receive questions from children from all over the world and update twitter channels directly from the depths of the Amazon.

Iridium GO! in the project “Last Chance to Draw”
In September 2019, the team went to Borneo, and Iridium GO! allowed children from all over the world to “travel” with her. An unforgettable meeting with the Penan tribe took place in Borneo, the team drew and played music with the Aborigines, met their leader, who is over 90 years old, listened to their story. 98% of the rainforests are felled for wood and palm oil. After a week with Penan, travelers traveled to the extreme south of Borneo to work with the Orangutan Foundation in Central Kalimantan and paint orphaned monkeys who had lost their forests and families. Orangutans are in critical danger, and the main goal of such events is the opportunity to increase people’s awareness of problems through art and communication, which helps Iridium GO !, and there is hope to somehow change the situation. Due to the level of smoke from the burned jungle to create new plantations for palm oil, the team had to leave Borneo and the orangutans a few days earlier. Iridium GO! allowed to change travel plans very quickly to ensure complete safety for travelers.

Iridium GO! It was an absolutely unique experience of “The Last Chance to Draw”, as children really feel their involvement in what is happening. The project involves schools from the UK, Ireland, Canada, Greece, Singapore, Cyprus, Romania, Poland, Mexico, the USA, Thailand, Brazil, the United Arab Emirates, South Africa, Australia, Malaysia, Indonesia and China, and this list is growing with each in the afternoon. According to some estimates, about 18 thousand children “traveling” together with John Dyer’s team took part in the project. The ability of children to influence the expedition, to receive answers to their questions personally and to create works of art helped them to become emotionally attached to what is happening.

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