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What is a BUC?

The basic architecture of a conventional satellite terminal is based on the historical desire to make the most open and free construction. Over the years, this concept has developed global competition in creating the functionality of hardware units, and as a result, the architecture has improved and costs for the end user have decreased.

However, since operational requirements have changed and technology has improved, it is also necessary to change the system architecture in order to achieve additional benefits. The CPI amplifier with an integrated L-band frequency converter (BUC) allows you to reduce costs and increase the reliability of data transmission at low and medium frequencies by eliminating duplicate functions in a conventional RF terminal circuit.

CPI (formerly Varian Electron Device Group) has been actively involved in the design and manufacture of microwave power amplifiers and related products for 30 years.

CPI Satcom Division (formerly Varian MEP) was established in the mid-70s of the twentieth century. Its main task was to combine the strengths of the existing at that time groups of researchers and developers in the field of commercial satellite communications and industrial power amplifiers.

Since then, CPI Satcom Division has launched more than a thousand fully integrated S, C, X, Ku, DBS and Ka range power amplifiers and has become a leading supplier in this area.

Description

The frequency of the incoming L-band signal starts at 900 or 950 MHz and lies between 500 and 1100 MHz. Care must be taken to ensure that the frequency does not exceed this value, otherwise it may cause damage. It is necessary to minimize the number of false signals, which can lead to reduced performance or even break the amplifier. The incoming signal can be broadcast at the following frequencies:

5.850 – 6.425 GHz
5.85 – 6.65 GHz
5.850 – 6.725 GHz
7.9 – 8.4 GHz
14.0 – 14.5 GHz
13.75 – 14.50 GHz
12.75 – 13.25 GHz
17.3 – 18.1 GHz
Ka-band (up to 1 GHz in the frequency range 27.5 to 31.0 GHz)
Three bands (5.85 – 6.65 GHz, 7.9 – 8.4 GHz and 13.75 – 14.50 GHz)
If the BUC local oscillator goes beyond the permissible coordinates or the capture band, then the alarm signal will be sent to the additional CPI console via the Setup & Remote software. An alarm will be sent to the port, but the amplifier will no longer take any action. Or the alarm can be set for a specific error directly by the user in the CIF protocol (using the supplied utility or the remote control panel). If the BUC is unlocked, the amplifier will report an error and turn off the HV. The reset command will restore the amplifier as soon as the error is fixed.

In Figure 1, you can see a regular satellite terminal with a client analog and digital information passing through a physically autonomous modem, increasing the frequency of the converter, lowering the frequency of the converter, HPA and LNA. In this system, there are three reference crystal oscillators and four synthesized generators contained in five separate devices.

A modification of this design where the HPA was moved to open air and was installed directly next to the antenna. This will reduce microwave loss between the HPA and the antenna.

Figure 3 shows how an amplifier with a new high power converter eliminates unnecessary synthesizers and oscillators. This reduces the number of physical servers to three. Eliminating unnecessary conversions can reduce costs and avoid unwanted side frequencies.

The basic architecture of a conventional satellite terminal is based on the historical desire to make the most open and free construction. Over the years, this concept has developed global competition in creating the functionality of hardware units, and as a result, the architecture has improved and costs for the end user have decreased.

However, since operational requirements have changed and technology has improved, it is also necessary to change the system architecture in order to achieve additional benefits. The CPI amplifier with an integrated L-band frequency converter (BUC) allows you to reduce costs and increase the reliability of data transmission at low and medium frequencies by eliminating duplicate functions in a conventional RF terminal circuit.

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